Not Logged In Log In   Sign Up   Points Leaders
Follow Us    5:28 AM

Recent Gas News/GasBuddy Blog

15
votes
pump to homepage help
In mining country, ‘war on coal’ hard to see

bostonglobe.com -- The desolate stretch of Highway 133 crests a Rocky Mountain pass and settles into a valley where some of the world’s most valuable coal is located — and the landowner is the US taxpayer.

If there is a “war on coal” by President Obama, as his critics say, then this might be a place to wage it. Obama has, after all, approved regulations designed to cut global-warming carbon emissions by nearly one-third, and he is preparing to attend a Sept. 23 United Nations climate summit at which he will renew his call for world action to fight climate change.

But here in the Rockies and across much of the West, Obama may be the coal industry’s critical, if unlikely, ally. The administration has rejected calls to place a moratorium on leasing public land to mining firms — even though such leases accoun
 (go to article)

Submitted 1 hour ago By:
11 Comments
Not Newsworthy
18
votes
pump to homepage help
More women haggling over car price

By Michael Strong of The Detroit Bureau -- Survey shows women enjoy process more than men.

The stereotype of a woman being unwilling to haggle with a dealership salesperson thus relying on her husband or some other man to handle the negotiations is going by the wayside.

The comfort level of women when it comes to rolling up their sleeves and getting the best deal on a new car is rising, according to a recent survey by Swapalease.com. In fact, women are more likely than men to duke it out: 33.3% of women said "it makes it a fun process" compared with just 25.1% of men.  (go to article)

Submitted 4 hours ago By:
37 Comments
Not Newsworthy
23
votes
pump to homepage help
At least 150 major companies prep for carbon prices

USA TODAY -- At least 150 major companies worldwide - including ExxonMobil, Google, Microsoft and 26 others in the United States - are already making business plans that assume they will be taxed on their carbon pollution, a report today says.

The U.S. has yet to impose a price on heat-trapping carbon dioxide emissions, but other nations are starting to do so as a way to address global warming so U.S.-based companies are factoring an eventual one into their plans, says the international non-profit CDP, formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project. The report is the group's first one to look at corporate carbon pricing on a global scale.

"We're seeing companies taking steps they're not required to, and they're doing this to be competitive in a carbon-constrained world," says Zoe Antitch,...  (go to article)

Submitted 5 hours ago By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy
15
votes
pump to homepage help
CNG pump: Small start to what may be a huge new business

Philly.Com -- Nearly four years after VNG.co set out to build a nationwide fueling network for compressed natural gas, the Bala Cynwyd company last week launched its first outlet: a single pump at a BP Station next to a Roosevelt Expressway on-ramp.

That Gov. Corbett would come to East Falls to inaugurate one fuel pump might indicate that VNG.co L.L.C. has bigger ambitions than building a few natural gas vehicle fueling stations.

VNG's founders two entrepreneurs with heavyweight business pedigrees say they have methodically created the foundation for an entirely new commercial sector that is just getting ready to take off.

VNG's business model is to build fast-fill compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling outlets within existing retail gasoline stations eliminating the need for fleet owners to maintain..  (go to article)

Submitted 5 hours ago By:
21 Comments
Not Newsworthy
19
votes
pump to homepage help
The Energy Trap, & How The World & The UAE Can Avoid It

Clean Technica -- Since the middle of 18th century, mankind has been using fossil fuel energy as a bank account, from which we collectively withdraw every year using a peculiar sort of ATM.

It's peculiar because we need to deposit a small amount in order to get the amount we want in return – the ratio of the amount we withdraw to the amount we deposit is energy return on energy invested (EROEI).

Fundamentally, we invest energy to be able to get more energy. Fossil fuels used to be plentiful and easy to get at; that gave them a high EROEI. Enjoying this bonanza, our collective withdrawals increased exponentially.

But that ATM draws from a limited account; fossil fuels are finite.

Today we are hitting the limit of the energy ATM. We can’t withdraw more energy without depositing a lot more than we once did  (go to article)

Submitted 5 hours ago By:
15 Comments
Not Newsworthy
17
votes
pump to homepage help
Toyota's New Transit Idea Is Like a Bikeshare for Tiny Electric Cars

Gizmodo -- Small, weird-looking smartcars are nothing new; there are plenty of them on the road, especially in cities where space is at a premium. But Toyota has launched something that makes great use of its zippy 3-wheeled i-Road vehicles: a new car-sharing service that integrates with a city's existing transit system.

The concept is basically a sort of bikeshare/Zipcar hybrid, meant to supplement existing public transit systems. You can reserve a nearby car ahead of time if you want by using an app on your phone, but you don't have to take it back where you originally found it at the end of your trip. The kiosks also act as charging stations for the vehicles to make sure they stay juiced up.
 (go to article)

Submitted 5 hours ago By:
13 Comments
Not Newsworthy
27
votes
pump to homepage help
Head of new Maine railroad company says he’s building transportation system to last

BDN -- BANGOR, Maine — The man behind the controls of the company that took over for the defunct Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway says he plans to turn a profit by 2015.

That’s not an easy feat, according to John Giles, CEO of Central Maine and Quebec Railway, considering Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway was profitable in just three of its 12 years in operation.

“We’re trying to grab this company right now and pull it up by the bootstraps,” said Giles, a 45-year veteran of the rail industry, who came out of retirement to head up the effort to save hundreds of miles of tracks from St. Jean, Quebec, near Montreal, to Searsport.

Giles spoke to a crowd of more than 120 area business leaders, government officials and transportation industry experts at an Action Committee of 50 breakfast gat  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
78 Comments
Not Newsworthy
39
votes
pump to homepage help
Protecting America's power grid: Calls for action

CNBC -- Electronic attacks on banks, retailers and oil companies have amplified calls to fortify the U.S.'s aging electric grid, which some believe is more vulnerable than ever to terrorism  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
242 Comments
Not Newsworthy
29
votes
pump to homepage help
Green Monsters: The Electric Bike Wars

Forbes -- The roar of a Harley-Davidson engine is as distinctive as the popping of a champagne cork. But what if you could have all the power and beauty of a hog with a silent engine that doesn’t devour gas? That’s the question Harley asked earlier this year when it unveiled Project LiveWire, its futuristic prototype for an electric motorcycle.

Harley-Davidson is hardly alone in the e-bike wars, where several companies are seeking to become the Tesla of motorcycles. And not just because it’s good for the environment.

Last year the major motorcycle brands–including BMW, Harley-Davidson, Honda, Kawasaki, KTM, Piaggio, Suzuki, Triumph and Yamaha–sold 561,000 bikes nationwide, up from 557,000 in 2012 but down a staggering 53% from the 1.2 million sold in 2006. This year motorcycle sales remained relat  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
194 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
Push To Impose Extra Fees On Solar Customers Draws Outrage In Wisconsin

Think Progress -- A recent move by Wisconsin utility We Energies to not only raise electricity rates on all consumers but also to add an additional charge on those who produce their own energy and sell it back to the grid has sparked outrage within the state and beyond. The plan would raise the “fixed charge” on all customers’ electric bills from $9 to $16 a month, as well as reduce net metering — a policy that enables customers with solar panels or other forms of distributed generation to sell their excess electricity back to the grid — and add a new charge on these electricity-generating customers.  (go to article)

Submitted Today By:
197 Comments
Not Newsworthy
27
votes
pump to homepage help
Islamic State group's war chest is growing daily

Associated Press -- Islamic State militants, who once relied on wealthy Persian Gulf donors for money, have become a self-sustaining financial juggernaut, earning more than $3 million a day from oil smuggling, human trafficking, theft and extortion, according to U.S. intelligence officials and private experts.

The extremist group's resources exceed that "of any other terrorist group in history," said a U.S. intelligence official who, like others interviewed, spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss classified assessments. Such riches are one reason that American officials are so concerned about the group even while acknowledging they have no evidence it is plotting attacks against the United States.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
28 Comments
Not Newsworthy
20
votes
pump to homepage help
1 Surprising State Turning to Fracking to Create Jobs

The Motley Fool -- When we think of fracking in America, North Carolina is far from the first state that comes to mind. However, after Gov. Pat McCrory signed legislation this year to terminate the state's 2012 moratorium on fracking as well as its decade-old ban on the process, North Carolina is now gearing up to start fracking its first natural gas wells next year. It's a move that could create a whole new sector of employment in the state.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
18 Comments
Not Newsworthy
17
votes
pump to homepage help
Oil patch driving is ‘whole different world’

Bismarck Tribune -- “It’s challenging around these parts of the woods. You have to be real cautious because of other people’s driving skills. People pull out in front of you and don’t realize how heavy a load you’ve got. You can’t stop on a dime,” Harris said.

In a region where dirt and gravel roads have sprung up to keep step with the demand of oil and gas development, finding locations like drilling sites and pipeline terminals can be challenging, too.

Harris said his territory ranges from the Canadian border, west to Montana and east to Minot, Bismarck and the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. And when there’s dense fog or snow and ice on the road, driving can be treacherous, he said.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
16 Comments
Not Newsworthy
21
votes
pump to homepage help
Oklahoma oil hub getting bigger with new pipelines

Fuel Fix -- CUSHING, Okla.— New pipeline projects are expanding the size of an Oklahoma crude oil hub that is already one of the most important oil storage facilities in the world. One new pipeline is in operation at the hub in Cushing, another is almost complete and a new project was announced earlier this month when Tulsa-based NGL Energy Partners revealed plans for the Grand Mesa Pipeline, a joint venture with Rimrock Midstream LLC, the Tulsa World reported Saturday. Grand Mesa, which will be open to oil producer commitments starting next week, will be a 550-mile system from Colorado to Cushing. Once completed, the pipeline could move more than 130,000 barrels per day from production. "The pipeline not only supports the continued growth and production in the area, but does so in a cost-effective an  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
32 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
Could new technology devastate auto industry?

Detroit News -- Communications technology has shaken the book business to its foundations, not to mention newspapers, and automobile manufacturers might be the next industry ripe for attack.

When the global automotive industry gathers in Paris next month for the biennial car show, you will hear the usual soothing claims about how healthy the industry now is, and how it’s poised for long-term healthy growth. The trouble is there are some sinister issues festering away behind the scenes which might ambush a complacent industry. There’s the question of future power-trains, with the agenda set by governments convinced that carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from cars endanger the planet, and insist fuel use must be curbed.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
51 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
Sun and Wind Alter Global Landscape, Leaving Utilities Behind

The New York Times -- HELIGOLAND, Germany — Of all the developed nations, few have pushed harder than Germany to find a solution to global warming. And towering symbols of that drive are appearing in the middle of the North Sea. They are wind turbines, standing as far as 60 miles from the mainland, stretching as high as 60-story buildings and costing up to $30 million apiece. On some of these giant machines, a single blade roughly equals the wingspan of the largest airliner in the sky, the Airbus A380. By year’s end, scores of new turbines will be sending low-emission electricity to German cities hundreds of miles to the south. It will be another milestone in Germany’s costly attempt to remake its electricity system, an ambitious project that has already produced striking results: Germans will soon be getting 3  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
36 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
Controversial natural gas rule changes came after B.C., oil lobby met

Canadian Press -- In Jan, CAPP made a presentation in BC's Environment Ministry, outlining changes they wanted to environmental review rules for NG projects

Those changes became law on Apr 14, but they didn't stay that way for long

An outcry from First Nations organizations forced an about-face from Environment Minister Mary Polak, who rescinded the revisions 2 days after they were passed by order-in-council

Internal government documents show 25 to 45 new NG plants will be needed to meet the government's hopes for LNG and that the industry wanted regulatory changes expedited so they could make investment decisions

The regulatory review carried out on the instructions of Premier Christy Clark continues, but the ministry says no further changes will go ahead without public review and input  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
27 Comments
Not Newsworthy
21
votes
pump to homepage help
Gazprom forces Poland to halt reverse gas supplies to Ukraine

RBTH -- Russian gas monopoly Gazprom has refused to boost deliveries of gas to Polish consumers after Poland’s state oil and gas firm requested an increase in supplies due to cooler weather. As a result, Poland has been obliged to halt reverse supplies of gas to Ukraine.
Gazprom did not satisfy a request by the Polish Oil & Gas Company (PGNiG) for an increase in gas supplies, according to the Polish company's official statement. Poland did not receive approximately 20 percent of the requested amount.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
34 Comments
Not Newsworthy
29
votes
pump to homepage help
Mazda 6 Diesel Reportedly Still a Year Away From U.S. Launch

Car Scoops -- The Mazda 6 on sale for the last couple of years is a stellar midsize sedan, but it was supposed to have been bolstered by a repeatedly delayed diesel engine for the U.S. Apparently it isn't dead, just still late.

A source at The Truth About Cars claims Mazda has had to fit the SkyActiv Diesel for the 6 with an after-treatment emissions system in order to comply with federal standards, something Mazda had not originally planned on doing.

This comes after the diesel engine, which was expected to launch in fall 2013, was first pushed back to April 2014, and then "indefinitely" at the beginning of 2014.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
43 Comments
Not Newsworthy
25
votes
pump to homepage help
Ford recalls older Escape, Mariner SUVs; coolant pump can fail and cause stalling

Associated Press --
DETROIT - Ford is recalling about 74,000 older-model gas-electric hybrid SUVs in the U.S. and Canada to fix a stalling problem.

The recall covers Ford Escapes from the 2005 through 2008 model years and Mercury Mariners from 2006 through 2008.

The company says the coolant pump for the hybrid system could fail, causing electronics to overheat. That can shut down the engine, increasing the risk of a crash.

Ford says in documents filed with government safety regulators that it has no reports of crashes or injuries from the problem.

Ford is expected to start the recall on Oct. 27. Dealers will replace the coolant pump for free.
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
40 Comments
Not Newsworthy
35
votes
pump to homepage help
Manual transmissions getting rarer in the US

Fox News -- The percentage (10%) of manuals vehicle's, offered in the US has dropped considerably since the 80's.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
91 Comments
Not Newsworthy
41
votes
pump to homepage help
Fresh sanctions will freeze big foreign oil projects in Russia

Reuters Via Yahoo News -- Fresh U.S. and EU sanctions imposed on Moscow will bring an abrupt halt to exploration of Russia's huge Arctic and shale oil reserves and complicate financing of existing Russian projects from the Caspian Sea to Iraq and Ghana.

On Friday, the United States imposed sanctions on Gazprom, Gazprom Neft, Lukoil, Surgutneftegas and Rosneft, banning Western firms from supporting their activities in exploration or production from deep water, Arctic offshore or shale projects.

The new measures, designed to put further pressure on President Vladimir Putin over Russia's actions in Ukraine, are a major broadening of the previous sanctions, which only banned the export of high technology oil equipment into Russia.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
72 Comments
Not Newsworthy
37
votes
pump to homepage help
North Dakota ranks high in estimates of gas spending

Bismarck Tribune -- The Associated Press reported the average American household spent more than $4,000 in gas in 2011.

LaDoucer wasn’t necessarily surprised by North Dakota’s high ranking, considering the rural nature of the state. North Dakota ranked sixth for its 12,248 highway vehicle miles traveled per capita in 2010, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

“A lot of people do a great deal of traveling to visit friends and family across the state,” he said. “If you want to drive to the lake or somewhere, driving 60 miles is something that occurs regularly.”

Idling cars in winter can also use up gas, LaDoucer said, and cold weather affects fuel economy. He added the state typically hovers around the national average in gas prices, and sometimes just above it.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
66 Comments
Not Newsworthy
44
votes
pump to homepage help
Why A Tax On Carbon Can Help Climate Change - And The Economy

Forbes -- A carbon tax, essentially a “tax on pollution,” has long been regarded as a potentially effective means of reducing the emission of greenhouse gases, but the concern about it has been its negative economic impact. Jorgenson contends, as described below, that needn’t be the case  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
85 Comments
Not Newsworthy
40
votes
pump to homepage help
Why the key to the economy could be in your gas tank

CNBC -- Gasoline is once more a wild card for the economy—but this time it's a potential positive because prices could fall sharply.
Forecasts for a national average of $3 per gallon for unleaded this year are getting more abundant, as crude oil continues to plummet and gasoline futures drop
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
70 Comments
Not Newsworthy
34
votes
pump to homepage help
Anatomy of an Engine: Heart Condition

Fox News -- It’s all about control. The four-stroke cycle working the engine is basically the same as it’s been for the last 100 years. However, the detail is very different. Today it’s all about getting as much energy out of as little fuel as possible.

So what exactly are the innovations that make today’s four-stroke engine so advanced?
 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
25 Comments
Not Newsworthy
37
votes
pump to homepage help
Have Americans really fallen out of love with driving?

Fortune Magazine -- The number of miles Americans are driving has remained stagnant over the past several years. Is this the end of American car culture?  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
69 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
So What Exactly Is a 'Road Diet'?

The Atlantic -- A closer look at what's been called "one of the transportation safety field's greatest success stories."  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
16 Comments
Not Newsworthy
31
votes
pump to homepage help
Most improved cars of 2014

MSN -- With so many new and heavily revised models out there competing for attention, there are some whose arrivals should be celebrated more loudly than others. Ones that simply get it all right, and greatly built on what’s come before. Here are the 15 top choices for most improved products for 2014.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
30 Comments
Not Newsworthy
40
votes
pump to homepage help
Global oil prices slump as dollar ‘strengthens’

The Arab Times -- LONDON, Sept 13, (AFP): Commodity prices dropped this week as the dollar strengthened, with Brent oil sinking to its lowest level in more than two years against a backdrop of solid supplies and sluggish demand. Sugar futures meanwhile touched multi-year lows, weighed down by expectations of a large surplus of supplies.

Oil: Brent oil prices dived to $96.72 on Thursday — touching a low point last seen in 2012 — while WTI hit a 16-month trough at $90.43.

Prices plumbed the latest depths after the International Energy Agency (IEA), which advises on energy policy to industrialised nations, cut its oil demand outlook citing weaker economic growth in Europe and China.

The news followed broadly similar demand forecast downgrades this week from both the US government’s Energy Information  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
51 Comments
Not Newsworthy
47
votes
pump to homepage help
Manufacturers making progress with diesel-powered airplane engines

Kansas.com -- When it comes to the next big thing for general aviation airplanes, aviation experts are looking toward diesel engines that run on jet fuel.

Several major aircraft and engine makers have announced the development of diesel engines suited for aircraft, including Wichita’s Cessna Aircraft, in part because of a need for alternative fuel sources.

“I make a prediction that as time goes by, the majority of models of today’s piston aircraft will at least have a diesel option,” said Brian Foley, an aviation consultant with Brian Foley Associates. “Eventually, I suspect the family of aircraft will move to diesel.”  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
37 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
Legislative leaders say coal rhetoric not helping

Charleston Daily Mall -- CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia’s top legislative leaders aren’t sure clamoring over coal this election season does much good for Appalachia’s already-sputtering industry.

In the Mountain State, federal campaigns have hammered on the fear of federal regulation further stifling coal.

Hopefuls for an open Senate seat and two competitive House races have recited the same conversation: Republicans lump Democrats in with President Obama, an ever-unpopular figure in West Virginia. Democrats zigzag to show they don’t support his energy ideas.  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
25 Comments
Not Newsworthy
39
votes
pump to homepage help
The Craziest Public Transit Solution Ever?

ozy.com -- Swarms of motorized tricycles and brightly painted jeepneys — refashioned American military vehicles from World War II — putt-putt through the sprawling streets of Manila, billowing exhaust into a sky so filled with smog that the sun rarely makes an appearance.

The Philippines may be better known for boxing champs and beauty queens, but the country’s emerging as an epicenter of electric vehicle (EV) innovation as government-NGO partnerships support initiatives to replace exhaust-spluttering public transit vehicles with cleaner, quieter electric models. Cars from companies like Tesla tend to grab the limelight, but greening public transit — thereby tackling the country’s twin problems of air pollution and a booming population — could make adopting EVs easier and faster. Compared to persona  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
24 Comments
Not Newsworthy
50
votes
pump to homepage help
New York City's Protected Bike Lanes Have Actually Sped Up Its Car Traffic

fastcoexist.com -- Don't listen to the angry drivers shouting at you. By reducing pedestrian and cyclist injuries and easing car congestion, protected bike lanes are good for everyone--not just riders.

When New York City first started adding new protected bike lanes in 2007, some drivers made the usual argument against them: Taking street space away from cars would slow down traffic. After years of collecting data, a new report from the city shows that the opposite is true. On some streets redesigned with protected bike lanes, travel times are actually faster. And it turns out the new lanes have a range of other benefits as well.

 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
466 Comments
Not Newsworthy
32
votes
pump to homepage help
LePage, Theriault unveil Maine-branded NASCAR ride

Bangor Daily News -- PORTLAND, Maine — Alongside logos for nationally known brands like Hertz Rent-a-Car and Toyota, emblems for the state of Maine and several of its local companies will be seen zipping around a Kentucky racetrack this month at 185 mph.

NASCAR driver Austin Theriault on Friday morning unveiled a Maine-branded car the Fort Kent native will drive during a nationally televised Nationwide Series race at the Kentucky Speedway on Sept. 20.

The vehicle is decorated with iconic images of lighthouses, blueberries, lobster and moose, as well as logos for a range of Maine companies, including Bangor Savings Bank, Kepware Technologies and Linda Bean’s Perfect Maine lobster.

Peter DelGreco, head of the business attraction firm Maine & Co., helped pull together the collective of private companies who te  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
12 Comments
Not Newsworthy
36
votes
pump to homepage help
Magdalen Islands cleaning up diesel spill near port

CBC News -- Authorities are working to contain a diesel spill along a pipeline near the harbour of Cap-aux-Meules in the Magdalen Islands

Hydro-QC emergency teams and Coast Guard environmental response personnel are at the site trying to clean up the spill, which authorities say could involve up to 13,000 gal of diesel fuel

The leak happened somewhere along a pipeline connecting the port to a Hydro-QC station

“We’ve closed all the valves along the line to stop the flow of diesel between the two places

Most of the fuel spilled on land near the harbour, and it’s believed only a minimal amount entered the water

Excavators were at work along the line to try to find the source of the leak

“It’s a serious situation, but all the equipment and teams are in place to ensure it’s cleaned without delay and  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
12 Comments
Not Newsworthy
55
votes
pump to homepage help
Struggling to Starve ISIS of Oil Revenue, U.S. Seeks Assistance From Turkey

NYTimes -- The Obama administration is struggling to cut off the millions of dollars in oil revenue that has made the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria one of the wealthiest terror groups in history but so far has been unable to persuade Turkey, the NATO ally where much of the oil is traded on the black market, to crack down on an extensive sales network.

Western intelligence officials say they can track the ISIS oil shipments as they move across Iraq and into Turkey’s southern border regions. Despite extensive discussions inside the Pentagon, American forces have so far not attacked the tanker trucks, though a senior administration official said Friday “that remains an option.”

In public, the administration has been unwilling to criticize Turkey, which insists it has little control over the flow...  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
1089 Comments
Not Newsworthy
45
votes
pump to homepage help
1Dead In Gas Accident On Offshore LA. Platform

AP -- A contractor was killed and two others were injured Saturday during maintenance on a Chevron natural gas pipeline off the Louisiana coast, authorities said.

The contractor, whose name was not immediately released, was among four maintenance workers on the platform when the accident occurred about 11:10 a.m. Saturday, said Gareth Johnstone, a spokesman for Chevron Pipe Line Co. He said the two other workers were taken to a hospital for what are expected to be minor injuries.

A helicopter brought two people from offshore to meet an ambulance, but both declined to take the ambulance to a hospital after being checked by medics, said Randall Ansley, shift supervisor for Acadian Ambulance.

Johnstone said he did not know what caused the death and injuries.

 (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
520 Comments
Not Newsworthy
63
votes
pump to homepage help
Houston pump prices could tumble below $3 per gallon

The Houston Chronicle -- Houston, prepare to fill up.

As fall approaches and gasoline prices continue to tumble, some Houston-area stations probably will start selling gasoline for less than $3 per gallon, said Tom Kloza, GasBuddy’s chief oil analyst.

“Right now it looks like all cylinders are pointing us to more modest energy prices,” he said. “The cheapest prices since 2010, that’s basically where we’re headed.”

Nationally, pump prices are averaging about 5 cents cheaper than last year, despite the turmoil in the Middle East and Ukraine. So far this year, gasoline costs $3.51 per gallon versus $3.57 at the same time last year. That gap will likely widen in the coming weeks as refineries continue to run at record-high levels and the price of crude oil remains relatively low, Kloza said.

The price of internati  (go to article)

Submitted Yesterday By:
1543 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
Coal scam: Supreme Court refuses to hear pleas of companies which were illegally allocated coal bloc

Economic Tones -- The Supreme Court on Friday refused to give any further hearing on the pleas of companies which were illegally allocated coal blocks by the government.

A bench headed by Chief Justice R M Lodha turned down the pleas of power generating companies that they should be re-heard in case the apex court decides to cancel the allotments.

The bench has already reserved its order on the fate of 218 coal blocks allocations which were declared by it as illegal and arbitrary.

The apex court had on September 9 reserved its order after the Centre advocated their cancellation while the allotees blamed the government for irregularities and demanded setting up of a committee to go into each of the allocations  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
19 Comments
Not Newsworthy
38
votes
pump to homepage help
As Gas Prices Near $3 Per Gallon, Exxon And Chevron Suffer

Forbes -- The desires of consumers and the desires of investors are often at odds with each other: Increased promotional activity at Best Buy means better prices for consumers when they need it most — around the holidays — but it also decreases the company’s margins, news that typically sends investors scrambling to sell their shares. Diners love Olive Garden’s unlimited breadsticks, but according to an opinionated (and activist) investor, the Italian chain’s parent company, Darden Restaurants, needs to cut back on the carb fest if it wants to reach peak profitability.  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
71 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
How Transportation Is Shaping Three 2014 Mayoral Races

Next City -- hool funding, public safety, marijuana — the 2014 mayoral races bring a host of issues to the debate table. And as many cities struggle to redefine themselves with transit-oriented development, public transportation is one to watch. Here’s a roundup of campaigns influenced by high-profile public works projects. Come November, new leadership in Austin, Washington, D.C. and San Jose will determine the future of several light rail lines and, in the so-called “capitol of Silicon Valley,” a sprawling grid that needs to curb its dependence on cars.  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
15 Comments
Not Newsworthy
28
votes
pump to homepage help
How Virtual Traffic Lights Could Cut Down on Congestion

The Atlantic -- The basic world of Virtual Traffic Lights operates like this: as you approach an intersection, your car transmits data, such as location and speed, to other nearby cars. The virtual system processes this information for all the cars in the area, with the help of a lead car that changes every cycle, and determines your individual traffic signal. Instead of seeing a red or green light hanging in the intersection, you see it on your windshield and stop or go accordingly.  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
39 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
Is air transport a health threat? EPA will decide

Oil&Gas Journal -- The US Environmental Protection Agency has the chance to demonstrate judgment when it decides whether air travel threatens humanity. EPA has given the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) its schedule for considering regulation, under the Clean Air Act, of greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft. EPA expects a committee of ICAO, which is part of the United Nations, to adopt standards for aircraft emissions of carbon dioxide in February 2016. Before it can initiate a conforming rulemaking in the US, EPA must “determine whether greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft cause or contribute to air pollution that may be reasonably anticipated to endanger public health or welfare.”  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
38 Comments
Not Newsworthy
26
votes
pump to homepage help
The best deals on the longest-lasting used cars

Forbes -- For cash-strapped consumers – or those adding another vehicle to the family fleet – buying a used car is typically a decision made out of pure necessity. It’s easy to see why: The average transaction price for a new car hit $31,252 last month according to TrueCar.com, which leaves a large number of U.S. households priced out of the new-vehicle market. A prudent, median-income household is able to afford only 54.8 percent of the average new-car cost, according to the latest Auto Buyer’s Affordability Index compiled by Requisite Press. Not surprisingly, CNW Market Research predicts 41,250,000 used vehicles will change hands this year; that’s up slightly from 2013 but is still down from its most recent high point of 44,138,263 units in pre-recession 2005. The good news here is that used-cars  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
27 Comments
Not Newsworthy
24
votes
pump to homepage help
China Could Upend Elon Musk's Renewable Energy Dreams

The Motley Fool -- Elon Musk has as much as $10 billion, not to mention his own personal fortune, riding on the growth of Tesla Motors EV sales and SolarCity's solar and energy storage system growth. It's one of the biggest bets ever made on renewable energy and it's made him a household name across the country.

To dominate EVs, solar energy, and energy storage Musk is trying to build out battery capacity before competitors can gain traction, and thus far he's executed well on that strategy. There's really only one place with the resources and wherewithal to derail Musk's hopes to dominate both EVs and energy storage -- China. The problem is that they may be doing just that.
 (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
26 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
Cushing oil hub getting bigger with new pipeline projects

Tulsa World -- The Cushing interchange, already one of the world’s most important crude oil hubs, is going to get even bigger.

One new pipeline is in operation, another almost completed and yet one more major project revealed this month. Tulsa-based NGL Energy Partners announced the Grand Mesa Pipeline, a joint venture with Rimrock Midstream LLC.

The Grand Mesa, which will be open to oil producer commitments starting next week, will be a 550-mile system from Weld County, Colorado, to the Cushing hub. Once completed, the pipeline could move more than 130,000 barrels per day from production in the Denver-Julesberg Basin.

“The construction of the Weld County pipeline project will help further develop the crude and consensate-rich areas in and around the DJ and Wattenberg fields,” according to the NGL pre  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
37 Comments
Not Newsworthy
34
votes
pump to homepage help
When sinkholes open, they can swallow fortunes

WTVQ -- LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Solid ground isn't always a certainty. Sinkholes can lurk anywhere, beneath suburban homes, city streets or even football stadiums and museums.

It's basic geology: sinkholes strike when soil collapses into large holes, caused by flowing water in underground limestone. The toll can be dramatic when the voids open, swallowing homes, trees or anything else on the collapsing ground — even prized Corvettes.

The Southeastern U.S. is prime territory for the geological phenomena — a potentially costly game of subterranean roulette.

In Tennessee, a sinkhole opened during renovations on the football stadium at Austin Peay State University. In Kentucky, a sinkhole gobbled eight classic cars on display at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green.
 (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
53 Comments
Not Newsworthy
39
votes
pump to homepage help
If Tesla’s Gigafactory can run on 100% renewable energy, why can’t others?

computerworld -- Tesla's Gigafactory, the world's largest lithium-ion battery factory, is expected to generate as much renewable energy as it needs to operate -- and then some.  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
55 Comments
Not Newsworthy
33
votes
pump to homepage help
Cars that drive themselves starting to chat with each other

Reuters -- An Acura RLX sedan demonstrated an unusual way to tow another car this week: the vehicles were not physically attached. The second car drove itself, following instructions beamed over by the first in a feat of technology that indicates a new stage in automation is happening faster than many expected.  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
59 Comments
Not Newsworthy
27
votes
pump to homepage help
“GLOBAL WARMING” ADVOCATES PLAN MARCH AMID RECORD COLD TEMPERATURES

Info War -- Later this month, activists are planning a march in New York City for “global warming awareness,” even though the northern U.S. is reeling from record cold temperatures.

Called the “largest climate march in history” by organizers, the “People’s Climate March” will occur on Sept. 21st, a few days before the United Nations will attempt to draft a “global warming” treaty on the same level as the controversial Kyoto Protocol.

“The Secretary-General has asked leaders to announce significant and substantial initiatives to help move the world toward a path that will limit global warming,” states a U.N. press release.  (go to article)

Submitted Sep 13, 2014 By:
epf
72 Comments
Not Newsworthy